Some people see things that others cannot. Tales of Mystery and Imagination. “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown” (H.P. Lovecraft).

Horacio Quiroga: Las rayas

Horacio Quiroga, Las rayas, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales



...-"En resumen, yo creo que las palabras valen tanto, materialmente, como la propia cosa significada, y son capaces de crearla por simple razón de eufonía. Se precisará un estado especial; es posible. Pero algo que yo he visto me ha hecho pensar en el peligro de que dos cosas distintas tengan el mismo nombre."
Como se ve, pocas veces es dado oír teorías tan maravillosas como la anterior. Lo curioso es que quien la exponía no era un viejo y sutil filósofo versado en la escolástica, sino un hombre espinado desde muchacho en los negocios, que trabajaba en Laboulaye acopiando granos. Con su promesa de contarnos la cosa, sorbimos rápidamente el café, nos sentamos de costado en la silla para oír largo rato, y fijamos los ojos en el de Córdoba.

-Les contaré la historia -comenzó el hombre- porque es el mejor modo de darse cuenta. Como ustedes saben, hace mucho que estoy en Laboulaye. Mi socio corretea todo el año por las colonias y yo, bastante inútil para eso, atiendo más bien la barraca. Supondrán que durante ocho meses, por lo menos, mi quehacer no es mayor en el escritorio, y dos empleados -uno conmigo en los libros y otro en la venta- nos bastan y sobran. Dado nuestro radio de acción, ni el Mayor ni el Diario son engorrosos. Nos ha quedado, sin embargo, una vigilancia enfermiza de los libros como si aquella cosa lúgubre pudiera repetirse. ¡Los libros!... En fin, hace cuatro años de la aventura y nuestros dos empleados fueron los protagonistas.

El vendedor era un muchacho correntino, bajo y de pelo cortado al rape, que usaba siempre botines amarillos. El otro, encargado de los libros, era un hombre hecho ya, muy flaco y de cara color paja. Creo que nunca lo vi reírse, mudo y contraído en su Mayor con estricta prolijidad de rayas y tinta colorada. Se llamaba Figueroa; era de Catamarca.

Ambos, comenzando por salir juntos, trabaron estrecha amistad, y como ninguno tenía familia en Laboulaye, habían alquilado un caserón con sombríos corredores de bóveda, obra de un escribano que murió loco allá.

Los dos primeros años no tuvimos la menor queja de nuestros hombres. Poco después comenzaron, cada uno a su modo, a cambiar de modo de ser.

Avram Davidson: Dr. Bhumbo Singh

Avram Davidson, Dr. Bhumbo Singh, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales


Trevelyan Street used to be four blocks long, but now it is only three, and its aft end is blocked by the abutment of an overpass. (Do you find the words Dead End to have an ominous ring?) The large building in the 300 block used to be consecrated to worship by the Mesopotamian Methodist Episcopal Church (South) but has since been deconsecrated and is presently a glue warehouse. The small building contains the only Bhuthanese grocery and deli outside of Asia; its trade is small. And the little (and wooden) building lodges an extremely dark and extemely dirty little studio which sells spells, smells, and shrunken heads. Its trades are even smaller.
The spells are expensive, the smells are exorbitant, and the prices of its shrunken heads — first chop though they be — are simply inordinate. The studio, however, has a low rent (it has a low ceiling, too), pays no license fee — it is open (when it is open) only between the hours of seven p.m. and seven a.m., during which hours the municipal license department does not function — and lacks not for business enough to keep the proprietor, a native of the Andaman Islands, in the few, the very few things, without which he would find life insupportable: namely curried squid, which he eats — and eats and eats — baroque pink pearls, which he
collects, and (alone, and during the left phase of the moon) wears; also live tree-shrews. Some say that they are distantly cognate to the primates and, hence, it is supposed, to Man.
Be that as it may. In their tiny ears he whispers directions of the most unspeakable sort, and then turns them
loose, with great grim confidence. And an evil laugh.
The facts whereof I speak, I speak with certainty, for they were related to me by my friend Mr. Underhand; and Mr. Underhand has never been known to lie.
At any rate, at least, not to me. “A good moonless evening to you, Underhand Misterjee,” says the proprietor, at the termination of one lowering, glowering afternoon in Midnovember, “and a bad evening indeed to those who have had the fortune to incur your exceedingly just displeasure.” He scratches a filthy ear-lobe with a filthy finger. —Midnovember, by the way, is the months which was banished from the Julian Calendar by Julian the Apostate; it has never appeared in the Gregorian Calendar: a good thing, too—
“And a good evening to you.
Dr. Bhumbo Singh,” says Mr. Underhand.

José de la Colina: Eurídice

José de la Colina, Eurídice, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales


Habiendo perdido a Eurídice, Orfeo la lloró largo tiempo, y su llanto fue volviéndose canciones que encantaban a todos los ciudadanos, quienes le daban monedas y le pedían encores. Luego fue a buscar a Eurídice al infierno, y allí cantó sus llantos y Plutón escuchó con placer y le dijo:

—Te devuelvo a tu esposa, pero sólo podrán los dos salir de aquí si en el camino ella te sigue y nunca te vuelves a verla, porque la perderías para siempre.

Y echaron los dos esposos a andar, él mirando hacia delante y ella siguiendo sus pasos…

Mientras andaban y a punto de llegar a la salida, recordó Orfeo aquello de que los Dioses infligen desgracias a los hombres para que tengan asuntos que cantar, y sintió nostalgia de los aplausos y los honores y las riquezas que le habían logrado las elegías motivadas por la ausencia de su esposa.

Y entonces con el corazón dolido y una sonrisa de disculpa volvió el rostro y miró a Eurídice.

Rudyard Kipling: My own true ghost story

Rudyard Kipling


As I came through the Desert thus it was—
As I came through the Desert.
—The City of Dreadful Night.

Somewhere in the Other World, where there are books and pictures and plays and shop windows to look at, and thousands of men who spend their lives in building up all four, lives a gentleman who writes real stories about the real insides of people; and his name is Mr. Walter Besant. But he will insist upon treating his ghosts—he has published half a workshopful of them—with levity. He makes his ghost-seers talk familiarly, and, in some cases, flirt outrageously, with the phantoms. You may treat anything, from a Viceroy to a Vernacular Paper, with levity; but you must behave reverently toward a ghost, and particularly an Indian one.

There are, in this land, ghosts who take the form of fat, cold, pobby corpses, and hide in trees near the roadside till a traveler passes. Then they drop upon his neck and remain. There are also terrible ghosts of women who have died in child-bed. These wander along the pathways at dusk, or hide in the crops near a village, and call seductively. But to answer their call is death in this world and the next. Their feet are turned backward that all sober men may recognize them. There are ghosts of little children who have been thrown into wells. These haunt well curbs and the fringes of jungles, and wail under the stars, or catch women by the wrist and beg to be taken up and carried. These and the corpse ghosts, however, are only vernacular articles and do not attack Sahibs. No native ghost has yet been authentically reported to have frightened an Englishman; but many English ghosts have scared the life out of both white and black.

Nearly every other Station owns a ghost. There are said to be two at Simla, not counting the woman who blows the bellows at Syree dâk-bungalow on the Old Road; Mussoorie has a house haunted of a very lively Thing; a White Lady is supposed to do night-watchman round a house in Lahore; Dalhousie says that one of her houses "repeats" on autumn evenings all the incidents of a horrible horse-and-precipice accident; Murree has a merry ghost, and, now that she has been swept by cholera, will have room for a sorrowful one; there are Officers' Quarters in Mian Mir whose doors open without reason, and whose furniture is guaranteed to creak, not with the heat of June but with the weight of Invisibles who come to lounge in the chairs; Peshawur possesses houses that none will willingly rent; and there is something—not fever—wrong with a big bungalow in Allahabad. The older Provinces simply bristle with haunted houses, and march phantom armies along their main thoroughfares.

Some of the dâk-bungalows on the Grand Trunk Road have handy little cemeteries in their compound—witnesses to the "changes and chances of this mortal life" in the days when men drove from Calcutta to the Northwest. These bungalows are objectionable places to put up in. They are generally very old, always dirty, while the khansamah is as ancient as the bungalow. He either chatters senilely, or falls into the long trances of age. In both moods he is useless. If you get angry with him, he refers to some Sahib dead and buried these thirty years, and says that when he was in that Sahib's service not a khansamah in the Province could touch him. Then he jabbers and mows and trembles and fidgets among the dishes, and you repent of your irritation.

Guillermo Samperio: Tiempo libre

Guillermo Samperio, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales


Todas las mañanas compro el periódico y todas las mañanas, al leerlo, me mancho los dedos con tinta . Nunca me ha importado ensuciármelos con tal de estar al día en las noticias. Pero esta mañana sentí un gran malestar apenas toqué el periódico. Creí que solamente se trataba de uno de mis acostumbrados mareos

Pagué el importe del diario y regresé a mi casa. Mi esposa había salido de compras. Me acomodé en mi sillón favorito, encendí un cigarro y me puse a leer la primera página. Luego de enterarme de que un jet se había desplomado , volví a sentirme mal; vi mis dedos y los encontré más tiznados que de costumbre.

Con un dolor de cabeza terrible, fui al baño, me lavé las manos con toda calma y ya tranquilo, regresé al sillón. Cuando iba a tomar mi cigarro, descubrí que una mancha negra cubría mis dedos. De inmediato retorné al baño, me tallé con zacate, piedra pómez y, finalmente, me lavé con blanqueador; pero el intento fue inútil, porque la mancha creció y me invadió hasta los codos. Ahora, más preocupado que molesto llamé al doctor y me recomendó que lo mejor era que tomara unas vacaciones, o que durmiera.

Después, llamé a las oficinas del periódico para elevar mi más rotunda protesta; me contestó una voz de mujer, que solamente me insultó y me trató de loco.

En el momento en que hablaba por teléfono, me di cuenta de que, en realidad, no se trataba de una mancha, sino de un número infinito de letras pequeñísimas, apeñuscadas , como una inquieta multitud de hormigas negras.

Cuando colgué, las letritas habían avanzado ya hasta mi cintura. Asustado, corrí hacia la puerta de entrada; pero, antes de poder abrirla, me flaquearonlas piernas y caí estrepitosamente . Tirado bocarriba descubrí que, además de la gran cantidad de letras hormiga que ahora ocupaban todo mi cuerpo, había una que otra fotografía. Así estuve durante varias horas hasta que escuché que abrían la puerta.

Me costó trabajo hilar la idea , pero al fin pensé que había llegado mi salvación. Entró mi esposa, me levantó del suelo, me cargó bajo el brazo, se acomodó en mi sillón favorito, me hojeó despreocupadamente y se puso a leer.
En el momento en que hablaba por teléfono, me di cuenta de que, en realidad, no se trataba de una mancha, sino de un número infinito de letras pequeñísimas, apeñuscadas , como una inquieta multitud de hormigas negras.

Poppy Z. Brite: Wandering the Borderlands

Poppy Z. Brite, Mussolini And The Axeman's Jazz, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales


I have worked with dead bodies for most of my life. I’ve been a morgue assistant, a medical student, and for one terrible summer, a member of a cleanup service that cleaned not household grime but the results of murders and suicides. Presently I am the coroner of Orleans Parish. I handle bodies and things that no longer even look like bodies; I sit alone with them late at night; I look into their faces and try to see what, if anything, they knew at the end. I do not fear them.

And yet not long ago I had a dream. In this dream, I knew somehow that my neighbor was in trouble, and I climbed her porch steps to see if I could help. As I stood at her door, I knew with the unquestionable logic of dreams that she was in there, violated and dead. When I touched the door, it swung open, and I could see that the furniture inside was tumbled and smashed.

“I can’t go in,” I said (to whom?), “the burglar might still be in there. I’ll go back home and call the police.” And that was sound reasoning. But truly, I could not enter the house because I feared seeing the body.

It’s not that I am close to this neighbor; with the modern passion for privacy, we’ve spoken no more than twenty words in the years we’ve lived beside each other. It was not her specific body I feared in the dream. I can explain it no more clearly than this: I feared seeing what her body had become.

When I woke up, I couldn’t understand exactly what I had been afraid of. But I know that if the dream ever returns, I will be just as coldly terrified, and just as helpless.

I saw a man die at my gym recently. I have a bad back from lifting so much inert human weight, and I keep it at bay by exercising on Nautilus machines. On my way to the locker room one hot afternoon, I became aware of a commotion in the swimming pool area. A man had just been found on the bottom of the pool. It seemed likely that he had gone into cardiac arrest, and no one knew how long he had been underwater. Two people – another doctor I know and a personal trainer - were giving him CPR as various gym staffers and members swarmed around. There was nothing I could do. I knew the man was probably dying, and I realized that while I had seen thousands of dead people, I had never actually seen anyone die. I didn’t want to see it now, but I couldn’t make myself turn away. He was barely visible through the crowd of people trying to help him: a pale pot belly; a pair of white legs jerking with the motion of artificial respiration but otherwise dreadfully still; the wrinkled soles of his feet; his swim trunks still wet. Somehow the wet swim trunks were the worst. Of course they’re still wet, I thought; he was just pulled out of the pool. But they brought home to me the fact that he was never going to go back to the locker room and pull off the trunks, glad to be rid of their clinging clamminess. They could cling to him throughout eternity and he wouldn’t care.

Fernando Iwasaki: Abonos naturales

Fernando Iwasaki, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales


Los jardines del cementerio eran los más hermosos del pueblo, siempre umbríos y floridos, sembrado de esculturas barrocas y adornado de cipreses majestuosos y soñolientos. Contra la opinión de todo el mundo, el alcalde lo convirtió en parque público y mandó construir un crematorio municipal, según el plan urbanístico y sus ideas de progreso. Pero entonces los jardines comenzaron a secarse y los vecinos protestamos al ayuntamiento, porque el viejo cementerio se volvió un lugar poco recomendable donde la mala vida crecía como la mala hierba. El alcalde organizó una cuadrilla de jardineros que trabajó de sol a sol, mas el cementerio siguió siendo un sitio peligroso porque algunos drogatas y travestones continuaron desapareciendo entre sus árboles y mausoleos. Los cipreses languidecen y el verdor de los jardines se extingue poco a poco. El alcalde no se entera y ahora quiere remover la tierra para instalar sistemas de riego. Tendremos que sacrificarlo igual que al anterior.

Charles Baudelaire: Les dons des fées

Charles Baudelaire, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales


C'était grande assemblée des Fées, pour procéder a la répartition des dons parmi tous les nouveau-nés, arrivés a la vie depuis vingt-quatre heures.
Toutes ces antiques et capricieuses Soeurs du Destin, toutes ces Meres bizarres de la joie et de la douleur, étaient fort diverses: les unes avaient l'air sombre et rechigné, les autres, un air folâtre et malin; les unes, jeunes, qui avaient toujours été jeunes; les autres, vieilles, qui avaient toujours été vieilles.
Tous les peres qui ont foi dans les Fées étaient venus, chacun apportant son nouveau-né dans ses bras.
Les Dons, les Facultés, les bons Hasards, les Circonstances invincibles, étaient accumulés a côté du tribunal, comme les prix sur l'estrade, dans une distribution de prix. Ce qu'il y avait ici de particulier, c'est que les Dons n'étaient pas la récompense d'un sort, mais tout au contraire une grâce accordée a celui qui n'avait pas encore vécu, une grâce pouvant déterminer sa destinée et devenir aussi bien la source de son malheur que de son bonheur.
Les pauvres Fées étaient tres-affairées; car la foule des solliciteurs était grande, et le monde intermédiaire, placé entre l'homme et Dieu, est soumis comme nous a la terrible loi du Temps et de son infinie postérité, les Jours, les Heures, les Minutes, les Secondes.
En vérité, elles étaient aussi ahuries que des ministres un jour d'audience, ou des employés du Mont-de-Piété quand une fete nationale autorise les dégagements gratuits. Je crois meme qu'elles regardaient de temps a autre l'aiguille de l'horloge avec autant d'impatience que des juges humains qui, siégeant depuis le matin, ne peuvent s'empecher de rever au dîner, a la famille et a leurs cheres pantoufles. Si, dans la justice surnaturelle, il y a un peu de précipitation et de hasard, ne nous étonnons pas qu'il en soit de meme quelquefois dans la justice humaine. Nous serions nous-memes, en ce cas, des juges injustes.
Aussi furent commises ce jour-la quelques bourdes qu'on pourrait considérer comme bizarres, si la prudence, plutôt que le caprice, était le caractere distinctif, éternel des Fées.
Ainsi la puissance d'attirer magnétiquement la fortune fut adjugée a l'héritier unique d'une famille tres-riche, qui, n'étant doué d'aucun sens de charité, non plus que d'aucune convoitise pour les biens les plus visibles de la vie, devait se trouver plus tard prodigieusement embarrassé de ses millions.
Ainsi furent donnés l'amour du Beau et la Puissance poétique au fils d'un sombre gueux, carrier de son état, qui ne pouvait, en aucune façon, aider les facultés, ni soulager les besoins de sa déplorable progéniture.
J'ai oublié de vous dire que la distribution, en ces cas solennels, est sans appel, et qu'aucun don ne peut etre refusé.

Ángel Olgoso: Designaciones

Ángel Olgoso, Relatos de misterio, Tales of mystery, Relatos de terror, Horror stories, Short stories, Science fiction stories, Anthology of horror, Antología de terror, Anthology of mystery, Antología de misterio, Scary stories, Scary Tales, Relatos de ciencia ficción, Fiction Tales, Salomé Guadalupe Ingelmo


Levantó una casa y a ese hecho lo llamó hogar. Se rodeó de prójimos y lo llamó familia. Tejió su tiempo con ausencias y lo llamó trabajo. Llenó su cabeza de proyectos incumplidos y lo llamó costumbre. Bebió el jugo negro de la envidia y lo llamó injusticia. Se sacudió sin miramientos a sus compañeros y lo llamó oportunidad. Mantuvo en suspenso sus afectos y lo llamó dedicación profesional. Se encastilló en los celos y lo llamó amor devoto. Sucumbió a las embestidas del resentimiento y lo llamó escrúpulos. Erigió murallas ante sus hijos y lo llamó defensa propia. Emborronó de vejaciones a su mujer y lo llamó desagravio. Consumió su vida como se calcina un monte y lo llamó dispendio. Se vistió con las galas de la locura y lo llamó soltar amarras. Descargó todos los cartuchos sobre los suyos y lo llamó la mejor de las salidas. Mojó sus dedos en aquella sangre y lo llamó condecoración. Precintó herméticamente el garaje y lo llamó penitencia. Se encerró en el coche encendido y lo llamó ataúd.

My Blog List

Tales of Mystery and Imagination

" Tales of Mystery and Imagination es un blog sin ánimo de lucro cuyo único fin consiste en rendir justo homenaje
a los escritores de terror, ciencia-ficción y fantasía del mundo. Los derechos de los textos que aquí aparecen pertenecen a cada autor.


Las imágenes han sido obtenidas de la red y son de dominio público. No obstante si alguien tiene derecho reservado sobre alguna de ellas y se siente
perjudicado por su publicación, por favor, no dude en comunicárnoslo.

List your business in a premium internet web directory for free This site is listed under American Literature Directory